In Grade 2, I was given a Kodak 110 for Christmas. I immediately began shooting pictures of all my friends at school—most of whom were wearing holstered six-guns over their Wrangler bell-bottoms at the time. I'm pretty sure you can't do any of those things anymore.

Since then, I have learned one great truth in life: people love posing for photos... as long as the photographer is seven years old.
When you get older, people start to get shy. One learns to adapt.

When all my film gear was stolen about seven years back, I adapted. (Right after putting bars on the basement windows) I bought a digital camera. I've done the darkroom thing—timers, trays, fumes and such. I even miss it—probably the way old folks miss boarding school—but I'm not going back. Pro digital is fast, powerful, and flexible. But, in the end, it's only as compelling as your vision. Your eye is the only gear that matters, ultimately.

I have a beautiful family and a bunch of great friends in Etobicoke. People sometimes ask me: "Why not shoot full-time?" The quick answer is: I don't want photography to feel like a 'job'. I want it to be something I look forward to: like a cottage weekend, or a ribeye at Ruth's Chris.

"So, basically, 'don't quit your day job'?"
Well, yeah. Sir James Goldsmith put it another way:
"When you marry your mistress, you create a job vacancy."

All the best!



I am a proud contributor to:

Families of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Canada

Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation

Dorothy Ley Hospice

Help-Portrait

Seventh Street Junior School

Lakeshore Community Childcare Centre

Lakeshore Arts

Arts Etobicoke
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